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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
they have always. and what i'm trying to do is do it what russell recommendation once awhile you have to hang a question mark on things you come to believe for a long time. >> thomas woods, what's the difference in your mind between the conservative and libertarian? >> well, this is a tricky one as i really -- my heart is on the table here. i feel like i have sympathy in both camps. i identify myself as a libertarian. libertarian has one basic principle which is nonaggression. you cannot initiate force against anybody else. i think a lot of people would agree with that. it's wrong to clock your neighborhood over the head. libertarians will take it to the logical. they involve initiation of violence against people who themselves who have not initiated. we would consider it to be legitimate. a conservative is less i guess id logical. conservative is deliberately or at least in the classical sense in edmund burke is not systematic. they have good reasons for being nonsystematic. life is too con flex. or to be reducible to left liberal most trum we have impose on the whole world. life is
't care about children, right? he very much shifted the tone because i think the recall of russell peters sent a signal to a lot of elected republicans in arizona that if you continued to march down that road of scapegoating latino voters, they can turn out and vote you out of office, as we saw with russell pearce, who was the author of arizona -- doing anything about latino voters in that arpaio raise? >> i'm still waiting to get the precinct level data can but what from what i'm hearing from a lot of people that were active in mobilizing latino voters, they did break records in terms of getting more latinos registered of course but i think there was a 40% increase in the number of latinos registered from 2008 to 2012. and, of course, that result in more latinos turning out to the polls. and one thing that these activists did was educate latino voters. instead of just lined them up, educating them on how to vote and specifically how to vote in arizona. because we have a mail in ballot process because of a voter id law in place. so a lot of the organizations were educating latino voters,
, playing soccer in the russell building's hallway, in the evenings when the coast is clear. i would not be here today if it were not for my parents who gave me the gift of strong values and unwavering support comment education to be whatever wanted to be. my parents were surprised when they saw what i wanted to be. they would never have thought that their daughter growing up in texas, a town of 15,000 good people, would think that she could be a united states senator. we have a wonderful public school system and i am proud to say i am our product of public education. my public-school see which were excellent, my university of texas and university of texas law school prepared me to be what i could be so it has been a privilege to walk these halls in the capital of the world's greatest and longest serving democracy. that is the data stands out in our memory, september 11th, 2001, of course, is the one that none of us will ever forget. we know exactly where we were the minute we knew there was a terrorist attack on america. and though we suffered horrific attack, the strength, resilien
. who doesn't care about children. so very much shifted the tone. i think the recall of russell pierce sent a signal to a lot of elect republicans in arizona that if you continue to march down the road of scapegoating latino voters they can turn out and vote you out of office, as we saw of russell pierce who. who was the author of sb10700? do we know anything about the votes in the that election. >> what i'm hearing from people who are active in mobilizing latino voters, they did break records in terms of getting more latinos registered. there was a 40% increase in the number of latinos registered from 2008 to 2012. and, of course, that results in more latinos turning out for the vote. so one this thing these activists did was educate latino voters, educationing them on how to vote and how to vote in arizona because we have a mail-in ballot process and a voter i.d. law in place so a lot of organizations were educate latino voters, it may be easier to sign up on the mail-in list so you don't have to deal with identification if you don't have the proper i.d. and choose to vote in person.
in the pension office for many years and in 1861 there was a new co-worker named john brooks russell. if you read a colored man's reminiscences of james madison and the entire memoir is included as an appendix in my book you will see that it starts with a preface. and intelligent colored man who works in the department of the interior. he was an eye witness to important history and i thought his recollections worth writing down in almost his own words. paul jennings was himself litter and learned to read and write as a slave. i discovered j.d. are was john brooks russell. he was the one who submitted to a history magazine in 1863 and two years later it was published as a slim volume by the same name with jennings's by line on the title page. there were very few copies ever printed. i am thankful that it was not altogether lost to history. it has been quoted by historians over the years especially the passages about the war of 1812 and we are celebrating the 200th anniversary of that war today. jennings had an exciting wartime adventures as he came of age and played a major role in helping madison
inside the country. >> ray, you russelled with this issues in the early days of the obama administration. i wanted to put the same question as emanuel formulated it to you, which is how does one integrate or reconcile an aggressive policy on human rights with a policy that is very centered on nonproliferation, is it impossible to do it? emanuel says there is a bay and in fact used the word expedient. i would note that the administration took fair amount of criticism after the green revolution for not speaking up strongly enough, early enough, as the crackdown began there it's also worth noting that about a year ago, the u.s. announced a set of sanctions on irgc and other officials on their human rights abuses, which is somewhat different. these sanctions were different than the typical sanctions which are very much aimed at proriff -- proliferators. so the administration would argue they have tried to grapple this. how would you answer that question. [inaudible] >> talk into the mic. >> i think when you kind of look at this issue, which is not upstrictly a u.s.-iran issue but it's imbedd
is spreading a rumor about you and we will work this out and this is something that russell wiseman and haley kilpatrick -- >> host: it was girl talk in the book. >> guest: girl talk, the importance of having older girls, people, talk to the younger girls and say you know, we have all gone through this and it's really hard and it's going to happen and we have to find better ways to respond. i think where you can really get the ball rolling among kids, and again getting kids who are confident and you can really start this and can make being kind cooler than being cruel has a lot of influence over the entire school community. and i think the pert -- third piece of the puzzle is getting parents involved. something that was the biggest surprises of the film was when i went to get releases from all the parents. every parent of the children about their kids to be in the film and as you can imagine, the commerce stations were really intense, particularly when the parents of the kids who are doing the more severe bullying saw the footage. and their response was not only to let their kids see the film
stringers, if you will. contemporaries at chambers and russell kirk as well. richard weaver represented the other two strands of it. but until the 70's probably communism was the dominant thing. something i have wondered about is, when ronald reagan was elected, whether, as you look at the history of the conservative movement, anti-communist and became much less of a deal, and i wonder if with ronald reagan the people that were anti-communist felt that they now have this anti-communist and charged it was the commander-in-chief and felt comfortable enough letting him fight communism that they did not need to put the same amount of emphasis into it that they had an focus turned to other things. anyway, so let's turn for a few minutes to where the movement yesterday after anti communism. of course we have had 20-25 years since communism to figure out where the conservative movement goes, but there are certainly, i think, some things that are different but a great many things of the same. basically, the tenants of conservatism with the same as they were when they first -- when people first
russell came. at the question about question about the neighbor cat may. september 11 we were allegedly attacked for -- in the wars in islam is war for but i noticed as far as the naval expansion in the past 11 years, there has been a lot more further people's republic of china and the string of pearls strategy into the indian ocean. pakistan is some most important city you have never heard of because the chinese got a post there to listen to ships going in and out of the straight of hormuz and they also have resource relationships with iran and sudan. and as i think you all know, records of those countries and how they tend to make war on their neighbors and also we have the china daily newspaper. its total propagandpropagand a for the peoples of china and i'm wondering, i think the chinese sold the ideas of -- which you might've studied at the naval academy but i'm wondering, in the next few years, with their lower number of ships and sequestration threat over us and the current expansion of chinese power, how would you best manage our military resources around the world? [laughter] >
; maya, age 9, and russell, age 7. but in january 1973, he began -- elmo began feeling ill. and i detail the fight, the struggle to try to find a cure for elmo's life. but it was in december of 1992 when bud zumwalt went to a renaissance weekend, and this is what i'll close on, where his handwritten note that no one has ever seen except outside of the family -- and i use it in the book. in his handwritten notes that were presented at renaissance, bud reflected on elmo's life, his death, and bud's own struggle for the truth. and to find out what had happened and where the cover-up occurred. i want to read to you what he shared with his second family. because the zumwalt family knows that bud zumwalt considered the renaissance family his second family in so many ways. and he loved, he loved going there. it was a chance to reflect b and be intellectually challenged and to be amongst friends. and this is what bud zumwalt said. under the title, whoops, mistakes and their consequences. as many of you know, i was the commander of u.s. naval forces in vietnam who decided in 1968 to use agent ora
to begin with. bertrand russell. it was obvious. we already knew it. and then my next page wasn't about how the babylonians invented the 360-degree angle. how did i know that? because it was in the history of philosophy. it was everywhere. so i was about to write on and i thought oh, if eric is going to read this book, i want him to feel what it is like to be a babylonian. to feel what it's like to be a babylonian, i have to put that in your hands. and to make you feel what it's like to have this in your hands, i have to find out if that's made of clay or wood or copper. so for a month, i pursued the question of whether a protractor is made of clay or copper or wood. and i couldn't find it. somewhere in the back of my mind, this happens every day and you go, you amazing idiot, how could he you be so stupid, you are following up this obsession about this. get on with the book. you know you have to say. go write it. as you can literally go through hundreds and sometimes thousands of research in the day, after going through tens of thousands of sources, why was i not able to find a babylonian
a second. you go ahead. thank you. >> russell from the strategic policy institute. none of us should be complacent about china's rise and there is likely to be a challenge ahead but i think we should pay closer attention to the things china is saying about themselves and their own priorities and we should be playing close attention to the remarks of the soon-to-be new president of china, who chairman hu jintao made to important points about the challenges china has in relation to social change and in relation to the economic engine and in relation to what he called interestingly lifestyle. this was a speech that was very different in style and tone and content to recent speeches and deserves close retention. >> totally agree. you get a final comment. >> first -- [talking over each other] >> you get one comment. >> this is not accurate. they're using a document from the institute library in that defense context. is very inaccurate. >> that is a strong statement that is wrong. that is helpful. just very quickly, i ask our friends on stage what they did with their hobbies, paul's is hoc
in the russell building's hallways in the evenings when the coast is clear. and i would not be here today if it were not for my parents who gave me the gifts of strong values, unwaivin unwavering supd the education to be whatever i wanted to be. i must say that my parents were surprised when they saw what i wanted to be. they would have never thought that their daughter, growing up in lamarck, texas, a town of 15,000 good people, would think that she could be a united states senator. we had a wonderful public school system, and i am proud to say i am a product of public education. my public schools in lamarck, wise which were excellent and my university of texas and university of texas law school prepared me to be what i could be. so it has been a privilege to walk these halls in the capitol of the world's greatest and longest-serving democracy. i think back to the days that stand out in our memories -- september 11, 2001, of course, is the one none of us will ever forget. we know exactly where we were the minute we knew there was a terrorist attack on america. and though we suffered a ho
this is to the capital, is playing soccer in the russell building hallways in the evenings when it is clear to and i would not be here today if it were not for my parents who gave me the gift of strong values, unwavering support, and education to be whatever i want to be. i must say that my parents were surprised when they saw what i want to be. they would never have thought that their daughter growing up in lamar texas, a town of 15,000 people would think that she could be a united states senator. we had a wonderful public school system, and i'm proud to say i am a product of public education. my public schools in lamar, which were excellent, and the university of texas and university of texas law school prepared me to be what i could be. so it has been a privilege to walk these halls in the capital of the worlds greatest and and longest serving democracy. i think back to the days that stand out in our memories. september 11, 2001, of course is the one none of us will ever forget. we know exactly where we were the minute we knew there was a terrorist attack on america. and though we suffered a horr
hand, we'll miss seeing them practice their corner kicks on the second floor of the russell building. by the way, if you have ever been with kay on one of her early morning power walks, you know her kids -- you know where her kids get their energy. i'm told kay has worn out multiple members of congress, several staffers and quite a few others on those walks. and it's a fitting metaphor for her career. there are so many talents in the senate that it's easy to forget what remarkable stories many of them have. senator hutchison is without question one of the most impressive. raised in an era where women were a rarity in politics, kay forged her own path, kicking open the door of opportunity wherever she went. in the process, she has come to personify texas independence. which is entirely fitting since one of kay's great, great, great grandfathers signed the texas declaration of independence. kay's many successes in life are a testament to her personal toughness and determination in the face of what would have seemed like insurmountable obstacles to many lesser talents. although she was
and their russell banks and, you know, their peter goldens and their judy barnes. they do love their local authors, and they do support their local authors. but on the whole albany's a good, a very -- they're a very voracious group of readers. one of the real calling cards here is, um, is our staff picks section. and we're all voracious readers, and people come in, and they have a certain amount of money to spend, they have a certain amount of time to devote to reading, and they don't really want to spend a lot of time taking a gamble on a book that they might not like. so staff picks is a section today go to immediately to find books that they like that margie read or julia read or susan taylor red, and then they -- read, and then they come back and say i really like her selections, i want to read another book like the one i just read. susan taylor's the one to guide me. and so it's a, you know, our communication with our readers that come in here is very intimate. we know what they like, and they know what we like. it used to be that you could run an independent bookstore just on love, but you c
and their richard russo's and their russell banks and you you know y are peter golden's and their judy lawrence' and they do love their local authors and they do support their local authors but on the whole albany is a very voracious group of readers. one of the real calling cards here is our staff recommends section. we are all voracious readers and people come in and we have a certain amount of money to spend and they have a certain amount of time to devote to reading in the really don't want to spend a lot of time taking a gamble on a book that they might not like. so they go to it immediately to find books that they like that margie has read rector jill you read and then they come back and say, i really liked her selection and i want to read another book like the one that she read. susan taylor is the one so our communications with our leaders is very intimate. we know what we like. it used to be that you could run an independent bookstore just on love, but you can't any more. you have to be business minded first and foremost because you are not going to get any of the rest of it unless you
to william kennedy's and richard russo's and russell bay in their peter goldenson judy barnes. they do love their local authors than they do support local authors. but they are very purchased grouper readers. one of the real calling cards here is our staff section. we are all voracious readers. people come in and have a certain amount of money to spend, a certain amount of time to devote to reading and they don't really want to spend a lot of time taking a gamble on a book that they might not like. so at the section they go to immediately to find books that day like that marquee read or julia brad or susan taylor met. then they come back and say i like her selection but i want to read another book like the one i just read. susan taylor is the one to guide me. so it's our communication with the readers that come in here is very intimate. we know what they like and they know what we like. they used to be that you could run an independent bookstore just on life. but you can't anymore. you have to be business minded first and foremost because you're not going to get any of the rest of it unless
. >> is tempting to say the white house could not russell the agency's but i think while part of the problem does not give a full explanation because i can say from my a experience there is laws they do have to agree -- comply with from the federal advisory act in this body with ambiguity and then the white house council office 10 street take the most aggressive push of the position that have to open telephone committee meetings i have a story how the president jobs council has not met in more than six months. it has now been 11. now receives unofficially their meeting by telephone in temptation of the basis banking a briefing from the treasury secretary are other councilmembers by field with the administration committed to chance "barron's" the could figure out how to do that in public as others managed to do the people feel it as an inconvenience so i think it is dead difficulty of rustling agencies to the ground and lack of commitment particularly with any political downside as was said as an issue collide with something with the political downside transparency goes by the wayside. they cannot
this country in an exceptional way. his famous bob dole and in russell, kansas who served in world war ii, was severely disabled, came home uncertain of their future but dedicated his life to public service. i don't know how many weeks to months or years i looked in bob dole's life, but he think the passage of this convention i on disabilities to place's work at the moment. we owe it to bob dole, two of the disabled him who stand with locked arms taking us to pass this convention. we ought to disabled people across america and around the world to stand up once again for the race of the disabled and for expanding opportunity. not just in america, but across the world. people say we are an exceptional nation. there's a little bit of egotism in that statement, but i believe it is. i ask for additional 30 seconds. i believe it is factual and america is an exceptional nation that said sorting the believe that freedom and liberty and opportunity should be for everyone within our country and around the world. today is our chance. let no minor argument over some minor political issues from focusi
and philosophical world which drive them further apart and make a compromise or difficult to achieve. walter russell mead has introduced the distinction in the blue state and read state model and the political development. the parties are increasingly sorting themselves out into different states and regions. it can proceed to implement with respect to visions of social and economic policy. the blue state model, the space model, the administration from the new deal. it's based on the concept of the governments can underwrite working and middle class income by requiring the taxes and the public spending on education and health care, welfare and public employment. the red state model has implemented and various republican states the regime for lower taxes, lower public spending as a means of attracting business and promoting growth. california, illinois, new york, texas, arizona and indiana are types of the red state model. but when these tendencies are added up across the nation, they produce. as pointed out, the blue state modeled collapse because of the cross and the effect of the tax. this evolutio
of our friends and neighbors can join us later today in the russell building up on the third floor and we'll make a toast to delaware and enjoy some goodies. it is a joy to serve with my friend. coon coon thank you very much, senator -- mr. coons: thank you very much, senator carper. with that, madam president, i yield the floor. mr. bennet: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from colorado. mr. bennet: thank you. let me be the first to congratulate my two friends from delaware on delaware day. happy delaware day. we have a lot of great things in colorado but i'm not going to try to outcompete you on beaches this afternoon. we don't have a lot of those. but i do think it puts me in mind of something, and that is our constitution. delaware, as senator coons mentioned, was the first state to ratify the constitution of this great country. my state didn't become a state until nearly a century later. i guess a century later. we're the centennial state as a result of that. but that constitution that enabled generation upon generation of americans as a preamble to that document s
, my neighbor in the russell office building, a gentleman in every way. he has been magnificent to work with as well. and of course my colleague, senator murkowski from alaska who has made some great contributions to the senate, with her consensus-billing and dedication and exceptio exceptil ability. i certainly enjoyed working with them and getting to know them. and to all of my senate colleagues past and present, this chamber would simply be another room with fancy walls, without the lifeblood of passionate service and dedication you bring to this institution and our nation. we all have our stories about where we came from, about what shaped our values and aspirations. and why we care so much about public service as a vehicle for securing for others the american dream, for all who seek to embrace it. in my instance, when my own legislative journey commenced when i was elected to fill my late-husband's seat in the maine house of representatives, i felt then, as i have throughout my career, that our role as public servants, above all else, is to solve problems. and i've often reflected
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)